Ed Kornoelje DO, Metro Health Sports Medicine

Is 80/20 Right for You (And What Is That Anyway)?
Does changing ones mind constitute flip-flopping or evolving?  Depending on the situation (and often the point of view) it may be either.  Also, is it possible more than one position may be correct?  When it comes to training, I submit that while there are some principles that hold true over time, evolution does occur, there are several methods that are valid, and circumstances surrounding the trainee often dictate which method may work best.  In short there are multiple ways to train, and it is OK to adjust when necessary.  (con’t reading)

What do you Think about Three?
Last time we reviewed the 80/20 method of training and how to run safely 5 or 6 days a week.  This time I want to revisit a question posed to me several years ago:  Can running only three days a week be an acceptable or even better way to train?  This is an ongoing discussion—the balance between running enough to get in shape and perform well and running too many miles which may put too much stress on your body.  In this article we will look at why and how three days per week of running may be the way to go for some, and what EVERYONE can do if injuries are starting to pop up or time is becoming an issue no matter what type of program is being used.  (con’t reading)

Running In Cold Weather—Anything New?
Polar Vortex III?  I don’t know if this winter qualifies as the third polar vortex in the last four years, but we have had a good dose of winter weather already this year.  So is there anything new this year to help keep runners warm and safe during winter runs?  For the most part tried and true still works—here are a few things that I have tried (along with some info from Runner’s World magazine) that may help your winter running.  All temperatures are in Fahrenheit. (con’t reading)

Be Smart to Stay Safe
There has been a shift in the types of athletes I’ve been seeing in the office lately—more broken or twisted body parts from football, volleyball and soccer players, and fewer runners with sore legs and feet. This is the “quiet time” in the weeks leading up to big races—this time of year around here it is Chicago, Detroit or (my fave) the Metro Health Grand Rapids Marathon. (con’t reading)

Course Correction
Have you ever looked back at where you came from and wondered “how did I get so far off course?”  It may be a literal (like in a run or hike) or figurative (as in life).  Many times when you retrace your steps you realize that while your most recent path is pretty good, one right angle turn at the beginning sent you in the entirely wrong direction. (con’t reading)

Maybe it’s a “You” Thing OR Eliminate the Hate

Compete: strive to gain or win something by defeating or establishing superiority over others who are trying to do the same.  While one can compete in many areas of life, we often view competition through the lens of athletics—as participants, spectators and coaches.  One thought notably absent from the definition is how the competing is done, namely the attitude of the competitor.  And while one can compete with any sort of attitude, I submit competition is a lot more rewarding when there is a little fun involved.(con’t reading)

Exercise in the Heat
The weather folks were right on—this is shaping up to be a hot summer.  Here are a few more things to keep in mind in the warmer weather:
Slow down. Running generates heat.  The higher the temperature, the harder it is for the body to cool down.  One estimate suggests that every five-degree rise in temperature above 60°F can slow pace 20-30 seconds per mile, and in marathoners the pace can slow about three percent for every 10 degree rise above 50°F.
Cool down. Run for 1-2 miles (or up to 15 minutes), hose off or jump in a pool for a few minutes—then do it again.  Or intersperse walking and running—the higher the temperature, the more walking.
Run in the AM or PM. If possible run at the cooler times of day—early morning (preferable) or in the evening.
Dress right. Light colored, tech fabrics keep you cooler by not absorbing as much heat and helping wick away sweat. A visor will shade your face while letting more heat escape (guys—watch the dome!).

Also, don’t forget sunscreen.  Even on cloudy days UVA and UVB rays will get through.  Use SPF 30 and reapply every two hours. (con’t reading)

Run two, three …. or more?
With apologies to the Beatles, can running three days a week be a better way to train?  This is an ongoing discussion—the balance between running enough to get in shape and perform well and running too many miles which may lead to too much stress on your body.  Some of you may be able to run five or six days a week and not become injured.  For many three or four days a week is a safer and more easily attainable goal.  In my opinion (as a physician and a runner) running three days a week will allow both safe and complete training!  So altogether now, read on to find out how! (con’t reading)

On the Move!
Every day I get a “Quote of the Day” from Runner’s World magazine.  It is usually clever, sometimes helpful, and every once in a while it speaks to me in some deeper sense.  Why do some things in life touch us more than others—a quote, a look, a comment, a circumstance…  Many times it is related to “where we are” at any given moment.  Life is always happening—sometimes it is good and other times not so much.  How we are feeling will often determine how we react. (con’t reading)

Just as Planned?  No   Success?   You Bet!
Have you ever said to yourself “It’s going to be one of those days?” Perhaps you woke up feeling ill, you spilled coffee on your shirt, or hit every red light on your way to work. It can be “one of those days” with running as well, and I had one of them at the Bayshore Marathon a few years ago. It demonstrates a few lessons about running and life, and can be used to make a plan for your upcoming events. (con’t reading)

The Best List Ever (for runners at least)
1.  Listen to your body.
2.  Pick a training program and log your workouts.
3.  It is OK to miss some of your workouts.
4.  Cross train.     (con’t reading)

When Right Turns Go Wrong
I was typing a note on my computer last week and suddenly the screen went gray—not black as in off or out of power, gray like it was still on just not working right. Good news it is fixable, bad news it will be a few days, and my article is on it and not finished. So pardon the brevity of this article—hopefully it still makes you think a bit. (con’t reading)

Rules Redo
I hope your training is going well. Our winter weather made getting outside tough, but lately running outside has been a lot easier. Following are a few “rules” to help us all prepare for the upcoming races. (con’t reading)

Winter Running – Yep, It’s Here
After the polar vortices of last TWO winters, I was not sure what to expect this year!  Even hardy runners had difficulty getting out—frigid temps, snowy sidewalks and shrinking road space made it a bit dangerous at times.  With the light November and December snowfall this year coupled with warmer temperatures, we may have been lulled into thinking we would sneak by without too much in the way of typical winter weather.  But things have cooled down a bit and we are in a more normal pattern—still cold, but getting out is very doable.  Whether you are a veteran runner, or just starting out, here are a few things that I have tried (along with some info from Runner’s World magazine) that may help your winter running.  All temperatures are in Fahrenheit. (con’t reading)

Heart Matters (part 1):  Sign up for a Race?
February is American Heart Month. Running has a lot to do with the heart—training improves many cardiac parameters that help it stay healthy as well as improving its function. However, questions about safety have also been raised, namely around race safety and how much training is optimal for heart health. Part 1 of the article will focus on race safety, while Part 2 will look at training mileage and intensity in relation to heart health. Bottom line: running (and racing) is extremely safe, and the benefits are numerous. (con’t reading)

Heart Matters (part 2): A Case for the Middle?
Running is good for the heart—right? For years now the health benefits of exercise have been touted (spoiler alert—rightly so), so what should we make of a recent study which suggests that there may be a point where running more or faster actually increases your risk of dying to about the same level as a sedentary individual? Don’t buy it. While there may be a sweet spot for physical activity when it comes to cardiovascular health, “too much” physical activity is definitely better than none. And, as you all know, there are other benefits as well. (con’t reading)

Listen To Your Body (and Other Important Tips)
1.  Listen to your body.
2. Pick a training program and log your workouts.
3. It is OK to miss some of your workouts.
4. Cross train.

While you may have seen this list before, it’s always good to get back to basics.  Over the last few weeks I have seen an increase in injured runners.  What can you do to stay healthy? (con’t reading)

Cough, Cough ..
Have you noticed a lot of coughing, sneezing, and nose blowing going on right now?  This is high time for viruses, from the common cold to the more serious flu virus.  There is one maxim we cannot forget:  Respect viral illnesses.  What is the big deal about a little virus?  Like children, little things can cause big problems! (con’t reading)

Spring Training
Shhh… Can you hear it?   Spring is on the way! I know many of you must wonder what I mean—as I write this, the weatherperson (remember, this is not his or her fault) is reminding me that another cold blast it on its way. The Narnia-like snow seems to be getting deeper, and when we crack the 30° mark it feels positively warm! But if you look and listen closely the unmistakable signs of spring are there. (con’t reading)

Special Considerations for Women who Run
Joanie, if marathons make you look like this, please don’t run any more.”  .. In a letter from Joan Benoit’s mother after seeing a picture of Joan after one of her Boston wins (The Quotable Runner p.165)

Many of us had the opportunity to visit briefly with Joan Benoit Samuelson in January.  As one of the best known and successful US distance runners (included among her victories are Boston in 1979 and 1983, the inaugural Olympic Marathon in 1984, and Fifth Third River Bank Runs in 1981 and 1986), she happens to be a female.  Yes, I know I just I stated the obvious—but that’s the point.  While most of the time running information applies to both males and females, there are certain situations that apply to females only.  Both men and women are encouraged to learn about these things, but the women will be able to put the information into practice.  And none of them have to do with looking like you just worked hard (as Joan’s mom suggested)—that is something we all should aspire to! (con’t reading)

Rules that Make Sense
I hope your training is going well.  It’s less than a month until the Fifth Third River Bank Run.  Here are a few “rules” to help us all prepare for this event, and others you may have on your calendar. (con’t reading)

What Would Mom Say?
With the Fifth Third River Bank Run and Mother’s Day sharing a weekend, here are a few things mom used to say which may help your running. You have seen these before, but mom always liked reminders as well!  (con’t reading)

Race Day Medical Information
You are almost there! Race day will be here soon and all of your hard work will pay off. Here are a few last minute UPDATED medical tips—read a few times!  (con’t reading)

What Now?
Way to go! You have just finished (hopefully!) a 5K, 10K or 25K and may wonder what to do next. Here are a few pointers: (con’t reading)

Some rest from heavy training is needed after any race—the longer the race the longer the rest.  While there are no specific guidelines that have been scientifically verified, some suggest one day of “rest” for each mile run—15 days if you run the 25K.  I believe that a reasonable approach is 3-5 days of complete rest, followed by 20-30 minutes of light cardio work (running, cycling or swimming) 2-3 times during the first week of recovery.  This is called active rest.  Push-ups, sit-ups, and light weight training are OK too.  Rolling and massage therapy are also good ideas. (con’t reading)

When Can I Run Again?
Way to go!  You have just finished (hopefully!) a 5K, 10K or 25K and may wonder what to do next.  Here are a few pointers:

Some rest from heavy training is needed after any race—the longer the race the longer the rest.  While there are no specific guidelines that have been scientifically verified, some suggest one day of “rest” for each mile run—15 days if you run the 25K.  I believe that a reasonable approach is 3-5 days of complete rest, followed by 20-30 minutes of light cardio work (running, cycling or swimming) 2-3 times during the first week of recovery.  This is called active rest.  Push-ups, sit-ups, and light weight training are OK too.  Rolling and massage therapy are also good ideas.  (con’t reading)

How Running Short Can Help You Run Long
For most of you running is a year-round endeavor.  There are local races every month of the year, and “destination” runs all over the world.  You may be in the middle of training for one of these events, or in between training cycles wondering how to stay motivated.  Maybe you are a beginner figuring out how to prepare for a 5K.  Here are a few thoughts on how running shorter races can be a fun way to train for some of your upcoming events.  (con’t reading)